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September 28, 2012
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First of all, hello!:wave: It's been almost a year since I contributed a blog post to this lovely group so I want to say hi I'm back folks! I have a lot of artsy things to share with you all that I've learned (and am still learning) so hang on tight! While I was thinking what to write as my first topic, I decided to kind of go back to the beginning as far as our thinking as artists goes in the creation process. I've come up with a short series called "Common Misconceptions" just to debunk some myths and misguided trends that are so often part of what we experience as we grow. This first "Common Misconceptions" topic will focus on traditional art.

:bulletpink:

Traditional is better than digital because it takes more talent and skill


WRONGWRONGWRONGWRONGWRONGWRONGWRONG. Did I say that was wrong, I'll say it again for emphasis WRONG! Like all mediums, digital art is simply different than traditional art in the same way photography is different than film. They are simply different. Photoshop does not "magically" give you the skills to recreate the paintings in the Sistine Chapel any more than holding a paintbrush makes you Rembrandt.

:bulletpink:

It's 'bad' to use reference images


I'll admit, I was wary of using reference images well into my second year of art school. The notion is that as artists, we should be brilliant enough to come up with completely original ideas (which is in part a completely different myth that will be covered later). Also, there's concern that if you reference something, you won't be really learning, but copying. Lastly, there's the idea that "good" artists shouldn't "need" a model to work from. Trust me, all of those ideas are flat out wrong. Part of learning how to correctly draw an apple is to study an apple! This goes for any subject you wish to draw. The area this is most debated is when it comes to drawing the figure. If you want to get better at "drawing people", by all means, study people! Beyond simply learning, having a reference image or model handy for your work is key for creating the best work possible.

:bulletpink:

This is 'my style' of drawing, so I don't need to learn anything else


If we give it a lot of thought, every artist has a distinctive 'style' of drawing, painting, sculpting, ect. However, that's a no brainer once we realize that each artist is a unique individual with personal aesthetics and reasons for the way they work. Drawing is one of the concentrations where this is most easily seen. The idea of this myth is a weak one at best. Not one person on Earth is ever at point in life when learning is no longer required or even necessary, artist or not. Don't buy into the 'my style' bandwagon. This will halt any further development in your drawing strength and creative process. Let me present a rather funny (and sad) example: I had my very first college drawing class about 5 years ago. I'll admit, I didn't enjoy it much, but I learned valuable things about the nature of light, perspective, ect. On the last day of class, we were all reflecting on what we all had learned and one guy actually said "I didn't learn anything, not one thing. I'm going to make graphic novels and comics, what does that have to do with drawing a box?" If you're picking your jaw up from your keyboard right now, you get the point.

:bulletpink:

Materials don't matter, even crayons are fine!


This is actually somewhat true to a certain point. You don't need the entire art supplies store to do something great, but it is important as you move and grow as an artist to have a look at what you're using and then see what else you could incorporate. Don't misinterpret me here, I'm not saying to go out and spend a fortune on supplies, because Lord know's even I can't do that! What I am saying is, if you've been using the same paint brushes for over a year, it's time to buy some new ones. If you've been working in crayon, check out oil pastel. Are you a painter, have you looked into mixing mediums into your paints? Working on college ruled or printer paper? Go down to the drugstore and at least buy a small blank journal to draw in.

:bulletpink:

It's ok to buy pre-mixed pigments


Learning how to mix color if you are working with pigments of any kind is very important. Pre-mixed colors have a tendency to look very unnatural and plastic, especially when it comes to skintones. Color temperature makes more natural, interesting, and exciting images. If and when you buy paint, try to buy the basics (ie.lemon yellow, ultramarine, cadmium red) and take some time to mix up your own hues, you'll be surprised how many shades of one single color you can get out of very little paint!

:bulletpink:

Because of technological advances, traditional art is dying


I can assure you my friends, traditional art has not diminished, wavered, or died since the creation of the computer, or even the internet. It certainly has changed and grown, but it is not going anywhere. One reason this myth is getting around is because how we as connoisseurs of art view it these days. Most of us see art through a computer screen, therefore, you're going to be seeing a lot of digital art because it's linked by medium. Traditional work is (and in my opinion will always be) best viewed in person. Also, the western art world is very much a bubble. Take a look around the world (and the traditional category here on dA for that matter!), and you will see quite a bit of contemporary traditional art.

If you guys have any more questions about trends and myths surrounding traditional art, just post them here and I'll try to the best of my ability and knowledge to answer them (or find someone who can)! The next 'Common Misconceptions' series will be digital art.

Thanks for reading!
:heart: Xadrea
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:iconmayshing:
mayshing Featured By Owner Dec 15, 2012  Professional Filmographer
:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
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:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
:)
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:icond-e-a-r-e-s-t:
D-E-A-R-E-S-T Featured By Owner Nov 13, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Great journal! I've never personally understood why digital and traditional works are compared so much. Traditional is one large category of supplies while digital is one supply with alot of uses. They just don't seem comparable to me. Pastels vs Digital makes more sense than entire category vs subject. Okay enough of my little babbling. XD
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:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Thanks! Glad you liked it! Yeah I thought I'd touch on that subject because it's brought up around here A LOT. Oddly enough, not so much I've noticed in real life and I've been to two different art schools so far!
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:iconjane-beata:
jane-beata Featured By Owner Oct 28, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Hello (:

This article has been FEATURED :heart:

:frail:
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:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Oct 28, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
thanks:hug:
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:iconalcyonesong:
AlcyoneSong Featured By Owner Oct 17, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
YAY! I love this!
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:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Oct 17, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
:D
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:iconblueprince312:
blueprince312 Featured By Owner Oct 16, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
even crayons are enough right
[link]
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:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Oct 16, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
I never said crayons weren't good enough, I was saying that as you grow as an artist, it's worth it to try other mediums. You may eventually find one that works even better for you.
Reply
:iconblueprince312:
blueprince312 Featured By Owner Oct 17, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
:) your blog is good,, you said it right? even crayons are fine hehe,, so i try to use them.. :) thats the result
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:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Oct 17, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
yup :) you did well :D
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:iconblueprince312:
blueprince312 Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
thanks hehehe
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:iconphoenixleo:
phoenixleo Featured By Owner Oct 14, 2012
There's something called pre-mixed colours that are sold? o__O
Wow...


Excellent article!
Why is it personal? If it was in another category, it would have been more seen by others D:
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:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Oct 15, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Well like buying pre-mixed "flesh tone" or varying ranges of any color in "hues". And I didn't notice it was in the personal category :XD: I shall change that right now!
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:iconphoenixleo:
phoenixleo Featured By Owner Oct 23, 2012
Hmm never heard of that. I thought people mixed them up themselves. o_O
:thumbsup:
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:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
yup and you definitely should mix your own! things like olive green and ranges of orange are better to mix yourself because the manufactured versions often times are somewhat translucent or they lose intensity fast when you mix them with other colors
Reply
:iconlulie:
Lulie Featured By Owner Oct 1, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Pretty sure traditional has diminished and become narrower in scope, because digital is so much faster so people who have to make deadlines tend towards it. But there is still a niche for traditional, so it's not dead.
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:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
no, it hasn't diminished at all ;) maybe in public favor, but certainly not in the art world
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:iconlulie:
Lulie Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
For art fields that have tight deadlines, such as concept art, a lot of people have indeed switched to digital. I hear artists talking about it in podcasts and read some pros saying how they've gone digital because it's so much quicker.

So it has diminished somewhat (there are some groups of artists who have switched to largely digital for practical purposes, even if they do traditional in their spare time), but that doesn't mean traditional has gone away or become small by any means.

Like, just in terms of logic, the only way traditional could not be diminished is if digital exclusively brings in new artists who wouldn't otherwise be artists. (Because otherwise you do get some proportion of artists who used to be traditional switching to digital. It may not be large, but technically would be diminishment.)


I think the most common thing is that professionals do both. Depending on the field (depending they're selling images, like illustration or concept art, or physical paintings), some might prefer digital for their professional work because it's faster and then traditional because it's fun/interesting/physical.

And of course it's hard to find anyone who doesn't use a pencil. But I'm talking about where the bulk of the work is done (paint vs digital).
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:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Oct 3, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Those are pretty valid points :nod:
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:iconlulie:
Lulie Featured By Owner Oct 3, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you, I appreciate knowing I at least make some sense to someone who isn't me. ^^;
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:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Oct 4, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
:D
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:iconmasterokiakai:
MasterOkiAkai Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
If one makes the arguement that the total art fields and professionals has remained constant and that there are more of them using digital now than before it was available then yes, traditional artists have certainly diminished. It would be kind of like saying something like taking away guns would remove gun crimes. Sure it would reduce the number of crimes committed with guns but it would not necessarily reduce crime as a whole.

The point is that traditional art is still a viable and profitable medium that is not going to go away. It's not like a writer switching from quill and parchment to a word processor. And of coarse the T vs D debate only stands in 2D studio art. Sculpture and mural art will always use traditional techniques because there just is no way to do those things in digital (skipping the 3D printer for figures part)
But traditional techniques still survive and see practice and profit. Digital techniques are born from traditional practices and therefore cannot survive without them. There are no successful 2D digital artists who are not trained in traditional materials and techniques or who have never used them. Just as there are no masters or mentors who teach exclusively with digital media and techniques.
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:iconlulie:
Lulie Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Yes, I agree with all that. I was just making a technical point. (Nit-pick, whatever. :P ) It was really just supposed to be an aside. ^^;

I bet there are masters/mentors who teach exclusively digital though (maybe excluding pencil sketches). If there aren't yet, there soon will be. I don't see why it would be particularly necessary to learn painting if you're a digital artist.

The differences are relatively minor/parochial if you know what you're doing, each with their pros and cons. Digital is better for people who like more precise control over things like colour (digital mixing is predictable, paint mixing is inherently unpredictable because it changes based on the exact chemical composition of the paints, so you have to learn how particular paints behave instead of just use math). So it's slightly better for masters in that way. But traditional has other benefits (for example, it's impossible to replicate the technique of glazing in digital).

I guess the point I wanted to make is: you don't have to use traditional to be a 'real' artist. Both traditional and digital have their pros and cons, and you should use the one that best solves the problems you're interested in.
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:iconmasterokiakai:
MasterOkiAkai Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
There are teachers who will run classes on individual programs sure, but these are not masters of a craft.
Don't see it as necessary to learn traditional painting if you are going to one day be a digital artist. Well there's all kinds of reasons.
That's the same as some kid saying "why should i bother learning to draw if i'm going to go into 3D modeling". Well every professional 3D animator will tell you if you can't draw you'll fail at that too.
Furthermore learners need to be exposed to everything so that they can find what suits their tastes best, no matter what it is. Masters are people who have already gone through that process and now are honing and perfecting their skills.
As for knowing what you're doing, that's something that takes time, a lot of time. And proof, not belief.
Digital as we''ve said too many times already is just another tool, another medium. If it works for you fine, if not, just the same.
But the concept of a "real" artist is one that only concerns frightened novices and self absorbed elitist snobs.
What matters is if an artist is successful or not and that comes down to proof, results and money.
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:iconlulie:
Lulie Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
The difference between a 3D artist learning to draw and a digital artist learning painting is that learning to draw is more fundamental, but painting is parochial. In other words, there's not a whole lot you can get from painting that you can apply to digital. Some, but not much. And not much that's important, or both relevant and hard to learn. (Unless there's a thing I'm missing, in which case I'd love to hear what it is!)

Didn't say learners shouldn't be exposed. But you can learn about painting without actually having to do it, and you can learn enough to see if it's worthwhile to pursue in a digital career.

I was thinking of concept art masters (not teachers who run classes). I concede I don't know any off the top of my head (I mean, I've never stumbled upon a traditional piece by Feng Zhu, but he may well have experimented with that), I just don't understand what's so necessary about traditional? Can you explain?

I think we both agree that digital is just another tool and agree that the whole idea of 'real' artist is silly. It was just that you were toting traditional and even saying it was necessary, so I want to stick up for the digital artists.

I think if anything digital is more necessary for understanding the underlying principles in art (for example, colour and light -- it is simply not possible to experiment with some of the facts of additive/subtractive mixing of light in a systematic way in traditional, you need digital for that).
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:iconmasterokiakai:
MasterOkiAkai Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
There's plenty of real painting that is applied to digital. That's why software is designed to simulate real media as close as possible (depending on the program)

As for what's important and relevant that's subjective.

And no, you cannot learn how to paint without actually doing it, you can't learn any skill without actually doing it. And one certainly cannot gain a mastery of or the comprehension to "know what they're talking about" without actually practicing.

And the only way to know if a career in art of ANY kind is worthwhile is to commit a portion of your life to it, give it your best and see what comes of it.

What exactly is a concept art master that you're thinking of? It sounds like someone who is just really good at making up new designs quickly. And that could mean any number of things in real world terms.

Traditional art media and techniques are no more or less necessary than digital. because it's all a matter of personal preference.

As a trained artist and teacher I understand the value of different techniques and media in and out of the classroom i pick no sides to any of them because art as a whole is more than just these two little things. You have been pushing digital from the start and that's fine.

No, digital is not more necessary for understanding the principles of art. Color of pigment and color of light are both concepts that are necessary in all forms of visual art. And i don't know what mixing that you're talking about unless you're referring to the minutia of specific color value. A traditional painter has a hard time producing good or believable work without understanding the color wheel of light and pigment. And a digital artist has just as hard a time being successful in the industry if they can't figure out how to get their prints to deliver their images properly. There is a harder transition from screen to print than there is sketch to canvas but both of these things can be surmounted with enough time and practice.

As for facts of these things, name some please so we can understand where you're coming from.
The principles of art are the rules of aesthetics that have been established by the common themes found in human preference and the inclination towards beauty in some configurations and not others. Traditional or digital has nothing to do with any of that, all these things are just tools for expressing them.
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(1 Reply)
:iconnarutokunobessed:
narutokunobessed Featured By Owner Sep 30, 2012  Student General Artist
Traditional is better than digital because it takes more talent and skill

The only skill difference from Photoshop is the wait time is longer. You need to wait for the paint or when spraying fixtave on pastel to dry. Other wise, everything else sort of on the nail. Its more then photoshop doesn't magically give you a better picture. All visual art encompasses the Fundementals constantly.

It's 'bad' to use reference images

All are correct, but its highly debated. In concept art, you do use reference images, but you have to draw a figure that does not exist but is relate close to us. Feng Zhu says you need to be able to depict a form with alot less reference, becuase when you go to paint for companies, your going to have to finish multiple paintings within the same day. However, before this gets to it, you will reference more.
While copying is hotly debated too. look up Everything is a remix. Remix is copying, and we can't learn without copying. Artist are remixers, taking pieces of what we seen and experience.

This is 'my style' of drawing, so I don't need to learn anything else

I think its a weak arguement not just because its halting a development. You can consider practice. You can't judge too quickly that their drawing is halting development. But that, of course you have a style, and everyone has a style. We can say a style is what you do. You have your own steps to do your art. The especially weaker argument is not learning anything else, which is not true. Artist have to constantly learn and observe things daily.


Materials don't matter, even crayons are fine!

Hmmm, its not a totally explained paragraph. Its true and sort of true that materials matter. Its that limited view that Brand names are more important then the actual pigments and reactions in a certain mediums, and could mostly mean that the person is looking for short cuts. Plus its about experimenting and trying something new. Its ok, to use crayons, like the master Don Marco.

The reason to get more expensive is that certian mediums and supplies do a better job to make mediums work with the artist and not against it, even though in cheap meduism, smart as humans are, can work around it or are patient. Mostly its the purity of the medium. In Prismacolors Pastel vs cheap, I find the pastels in the cheaper version are not easy to work with. The cheap do not layer very well, and they come off more easily then Prismas colors. Plus as all of cheap mediums, they are not pure colors when mixed then prisma colors. Or if you just buy the acrylics only, they dry out quickly and its hard to get a good fluid line.



It's ok to buy pre-mixed pigments

The Paragraph I sort of Agree with if your first doing art, but as you get into detail, its actually also about the properties in the pigments too for certain mediums. I know because Im taking acrylic classes and never though that alizirin crimson and pythalo green would make a natural black. Its because these are pretty dark pigments. And I also was about to say the timing, since as long as you understand color theory, it helps, but since you mentioned it, its a never mind.


Because of technological advances, traditional art is dying

It only dimished alot of the old practices of the animation industry. Fact is, its all started with John Lassister. When he introduced Digital art to them, they kick him out, because they were afraid that it will put traditional animators out of the job. And in a way it kind of did. Dreamworks was 2D, but turned completely 3D. There is less true Traditional animation, because computer do a better job. Of course its not completely gone, because hey, there always still some out there, like Hayao Miyazaki.

Yet, John has stated that they all still have the love for traiditonal, despite their workings at Pixar. They never intended for these to go out of buisness. So in a way, thats how traditional should be still alive.

In fact, it should say, that digital has changed traditional quite a bit. Princess and the frog was storyboarded with Toon Boom, but drawn traditionally.
Reply
:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Oct 3, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
nice responses :) i'll expand on what i meant in materials a little more for you: as you grow as an artist and gain more confidence, you'll want to add more to your arsenal, but you'll also want to be economical. if you're painting in oil without any mediums, chances are, you're wasting a lot of paint and mineral spirits. for a beginner, this wouldn't be an issue because you would be just understanding the nature of the paint on its own, after you're comfortable with that, begin shaking it up. if you draw, explore other drawing materials, don't just stick to the same graphite...switch brands! maybe one brand offers something than the one you're currently using ;) and i can't stress enough that all artists need to work on archival surfaces and that's not something that's given much thought by a lot of people. i'm not saying go buy super expensive materials (because even those can be crap), i'm saying that if you're using student grade paint and having trouble with getting intense color, bump up the grade and you'll see how strong and rich more pure pigments are. if you're using itsy bitsy brushes, consider what kind of marks you're making (and how long it takes you to paint) and decide whether or not you should buy bigger brushes :)
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:iconcyangmou:
Cyangmou Featured By Owner Sep 30, 2012
There are some prety valid points you made, this was a great read.
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:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
I'm glad you liked it :)
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:iconbluewyrm:
Bluewyrm Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2012
On premixed pigments:

If your (watercolor, at least) paint is actually lemon yellow/cadmium red/ultramarine and not generic yellow/red/blue, you'll probably want to get other basic pigments as well. Based on personal experience, I can say that lemon yellow is a cool yellow and will look pretty pukey if you try to use it to make a warm orange! Buying pre-mixed pigments is probably a bad idea; but buying different pigments is another story.
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:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
yes, always buy the basics :nod: lemon yellow was just an example lol, but yes it's a cool shade of yellow and it wouldn't be a bad idea to buy at least three different shades of each primary
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:iconyumedeli:
YumeDeli Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2012  Student
I try my hand at both traditional and digital art, it's both difficult, but in other ways. But for me personally digital is much more frustrating, coloring within the lines gets tiresome, and I get the feeling I'm a bit messy for proper digital line art. Setting up everything for traditional at takes more work though. Well at least it does with paints.
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:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
:nod: yup there's differences all around lol
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:iconrebekahkroeplin:
RebekahKroeplin Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2012
You make a lot of really excellent points. I've been thinking for a while now that I'm just gonna stick to my original style and nothing else. Well, now I don't think I was being fair with myself. Your totally right in all the areas you pointed out. Thanks for sharing!
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:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
don't be afraid to branch out and have fun!
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:icondr-aim:
Dr-Aim Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2012  Student General Artist
Nice article, many points have already been explored by many people, but they can't be repeated enough (especially the anti-"that's my style !")
I would personnaly agree with "material doesn't matter" because I believe that a good artist can work with anything, but it's true that you'd get a better results with better tools... IF YOU KNOW HOW TO USE THEM hahahaha I just can't imagine buying liquitex high-quality paint to a beginner. Even buying them for me seems ridiculous, ahaha. (well I use them for only one classe which use very few so it's okay, and I actually got some nice results.)
art is like a videogame, you start with not so good equipement, xp quickly, then start reaching good equipement and improve much, much slowlier, with long, long struggles in front of your work... wherever it is traditional or digital art.
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:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
:lol: i like your art is a videogame idea, i've hear that one before :D we're constantly levelling up :D
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:icondr-aim:
Dr-Aim Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2012  Student General Artist
so there's no limit ?
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:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Oct 3, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
nope :XD:
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:icondark-spectrumds:
Dark-SpectrumDS Featured By Owner Oct 1, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
That's a good analogy.^^ I consider a lot of thins to be like video games, especially in the learning process. They are called "experience points" for a reason!XD
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:icondr-aim:
Dr-Aim Featured By Owner Oct 1, 2012  Student General Artist
more like videogames are inspired from real life anyway but points still stand, ahaha
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:icondark-spectrumds:
Dark-SpectrumDS Featured By Owner Oct 1, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Haha, yep. You're right!^^
But I still don't see why outside people still act like games are so bad since they're so versatile in situations like this... oh well, games aren't going anywhere anytime soon.XD
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:icondr-aim:
Dr-Aim Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2012  Student General Artist
who knows, they say the end of the world is near.
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:iconharrisons-forge:
Harrisons-Forge Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2012  Professional General Artist
Thanks for a great article, some really good advice. I do disagree with one thing though.....

.....throw my brushes away after a year....with respect....over my dead body lol

I was raised in the belief that a good crafter looks after their tools . If you care for your brushes correctly and buy good quality brushes to start with, they can last for a long time providing your style is not overly energetic. We all have our favourite brushes that are sat in the back of the brush pot looking like something out of the Ark, but we won't part with until the last bristle has fallen out of lol
Some brushes will last longer than others due to the medium they are used with, I have some watercolour brushes which have been in use for over 20 years...I couldn't tell you what make they are as all the paint has flaked off, but they are still perfectly good brushes. I have other brushes which were bought cheaply for specific tasks that I expected to have to throw away that are still going strong.

With waste and recycling high on the list of considerations in our overcrowded world, I would not advocate replacing anything unnecessarily. At the same time, do not let your art suffer for the lack of a decent brush ;)
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:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
What I meant with the materials is that if it's been used so much that the bristles are almost non-existent, throw it out ;) I don't spend a lot of money on my water media brushes so they last about a year (and for a 30 pack of $5 brushes I figure that's a pretty good value) Now my oils brushes last longer because they were MUCH more expensive and easier to care for.
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:iconharrisons-forge:
Harrisons-Forge Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2012  Professional General Artist
Thats ok, I just hate to see waste.....I blame my grandparents, as they had a big input in my upbringing and they were still working under war rules...they never wasted anything that might have some further use in it, my grans house was a nightmare to sort when she moved in with my mum.
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:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
i hear ya :D i paint on the back of old paintings and drawings rather than throw it out, in fact one painting i have has had like 5 different paintings on it since i bought the canvas :XD:
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